Building a BPMS Web Application Part 2: Remote Java API

(This article assumes some basic knowledge of the JBoss BPM Suite including using Business Central.)

In Part 1, I described how to make use of the BPMS form metadata, run it through a code generator to produce JSPs for the UI and Java ActionBeans to handle these JSPs (for process instantiation and manual task interaction). Although the code to integrate with BPMS eg, to kick off a process instance and interact with the human tasks can be found partially in the generated ActionBeans, how exactly it works is still shrouded in mystery. This article will solve the mystery. Continue reading Building a BPMS Web Application Part 2: Remote Java API

Building a BPMS Web Application Part 1: Code Generation

(This article assumes some basic knowledge of the JBoss BPM Suite including using Business Central.)

In a previous article, I described how to use the new jBPM Form API to build a BPMS web application. I also outlined a different approach in which code generation can be used to replicate the forms to the web application using the form metadata on the BPMS Execution Server. Although I provided a link to my OpenShift implementation of such a BPMS web application, the technical details on how this is achieved is still scarce. This article remedies that. Here is a recap on why we want to build a web front end to a business process. BPMS forms are generated and customised by business analysts when they create business processes. Few customers use the forms on the BPMS Execution Servers. They prefer to build a web application that interacts with the business process remotely running on a BPMS Execution Server so that fine-grained access control, consistent look-and-feel and better client interaction can be achieved. One way to do this is by using the new jBPM Form API and the other way is to use code generation to replicate the forms using the form metadata. Continue reading Building a BPMS Web Application Part 1: Code Generation

Building a JBoss BPMS Web Application using jBPM Form API

(This article assumes some basic knowledge of the JBoss BPM Suite including using Business Central.)

JBoss BPMS forms are generated and customised by business analysts when they create business processes. The forms are usually used for kicking off a business process instance and interacting with the user when the process reaches a user task eg, for a manager to manually approve a loan. Few customers use the forms on the BPMS Execution Servers. They prefer to build a web application that interacts with a business process remotely running on a BPMS Execution Server to gain fine-grained access control, consistent look-and-feel and better client interaction. The main issue is how to use the forms generated on the BPMS server from the web application. There was no easy way to do that until the recent release of JBoss BPMS 6.1. Continue reading Building a JBoss BPMS Web Application using jBPM Form API

Robot Programming using JBoss BRMS

One of my hobbies is building robots. After programming several robots, I say to myself: there’s got to be a better way of doing this. You program the behaviour of a robot using a micro-controller. Every time you want to make a change, you have to re-flash the on-board non-volatile flash memory. If you compare this practice with enterprise applications, it is similar to that of many older enterprise applications which embed business logic in code. The solution is to move the embedded business logic (in our case, the robot behaviours programmed on micro-controller) out to be managed and executed by a business rules engine. This is exactly what I did. And I call my robot CepBot. Continue reading Robot Programming using JBoss BRMS

Building a JBoss BPMS Rules Application without Writing Code

This article assumes some basic knowledge of the JBoss BPM Suite including using Business Central.

JBoss BPM Suite (BPMS) and JBoss Business Rule Management System (BRMS) 6.1 introduced a new component called the Real-time Decision Server (RTDS). Rule projects built using BPMS can be deployed directly onto the Real-time Decision Server via Business Central. Applications can instantiate and execute rules on the RTDS using either a REST or JMS interface.

In this article, I am going to show you how you can build a rule-based application without writing even a single line of Java code. The application aims to rate locations for placement of mobile speed cameras. It is an example application I made up and is not being used by any Police Departments. My simplified speed camera placement rating criteria are based on: Continue reading Building a JBoss BPMS Rules Application without Writing Code